Computer Hardware:
     • Tools, Static & Cleaning
     • Form Factor
     • PC Case & Fans
     • Motherboard
     • Processor (CPU)
     • Power Supply Unit
     • RAM
     • Hard Drive
     • Solid State Drive
     • Optical Drive
     • Floppy Disk Drive
     • Graphics Card
     • Sound Card
     • Network Card
     • Computer Monitor
     • Keyboard & Mouse
     • Laptop / Netbook
     • Building a Computer
     • Overclocking

Operating System & Backup:
     • Operating System
     • Drivers
     • Windows Tools
     • User Accounts
     • Backup
     • Windows 10

Internet & Network:
     • Internet
     • Wi-fi or Cable
     • Improve Broadband Speed
     • Network Computers

Computer Peripherals:
     • Printer
     • Scanner
     • External Hard Drive
     • USB Flash Drive

Computer Security:
     • Anti-virus
     • Anti-Spyware
     • Phishing
     • Firewall

Common PC Problems:
     • Slow Computer
     • Hardware Failure
     • Software Failure
     • Printing Problems

Miscellaneous:
     • Windows Shortcuts
     • Glossary of Terms
     • HTML Colour Picker
     • Number Base Converter

Keyboard & Mouse

The Keyboard and Mouse allow the user to input data into their computer.

Computer Keyboard and Mouse:

Computer Keyboard & Mouse.

Keyboard:

The Keyboard has not really changed much over the years and uses a common QWERTY based layout, based on a typewriter. It may also include a keypad to make entering numbers much quicker and easier. There are also a number of modifier keys which include shift, ctrl, and alt etc which are combined with other keys to trigger an action from the computer. A number of function keys are used for special commands on your computer and some Keyboards have extra keys for volume control, browser, e-mail etc.

A wired Keyboard connects to the computer with either a PS/2 or a USB connector. The PS/2 connector on a computer is a small 6-pin Mini-DIN which is usually coloured purple. The USB connector is probably more common today and does have the advantage that it is hot-swappable which means you can plug the Keyboard in even when the computer is already on.

You can also buy a wireless Keyboard which looks neater by doing away with any cables. It will however need batteries in the Keyboard and a wireless dongle in the USB port of your computer.

An ergonomic Keyboard is specially shaped to fit the position of your hands and to make it more comfortable to type. It may also include a cushioned palm rest.

You can configure Keyboard settings in Microsoft Windows by going to the Control Panel and selecting 'Keyboard'. You can adjust the 'Repeat Delay' and 'Repeat Rate' which change the way that applications deal with quick keystrokes. You can also adjust the 'Cursor Blink Rate'. There is also a Hardware tab for checking driver settings and if your Keyboard is working okay.

It is important to make sure your Keyboard is set to the correct country and language so that the special symbols on your keys work correctly. This can be set in Microsoft Windows by going to the Control Panel and selecting 'Region and Language' and selecting 'Keyboards and Languages' then selecting your country. Alternatively you can also type 'intl.cpl' in the Start Search Box.

Keyboard Settings
Keyboard Settings
Mouse Settings
Mouse Settings

Mouse:

A Mouse allows the user to move a pointer on the screen to select icons and manipulate windows in a graphical user interface (GUI).

The Mouse is designed to fit in one hand and has two main buttons for 'right-clicking' and 'left clicking' as well as a 'scroll wheel' and sometimes additional buttons.

The two main types of Mouse are the mechanical Mouse and the optical Mouse. A mechanical Mouse has a ball underneath which is moved over a mouse mat and which rotates an x-axis roller and a y-axis roller to determine the position of the pointer on the screen, and an optical Mouse has a sensor underneath which determines where the pointer is on the screen. An optical Mouse uses one or more LEDs and an imaging array of photodiodes to detect movement. You can also get a laser Mouse which uses coherent laser light.

A wired Mouse is connected to the computer via a PS/2 or a USB connector. The PS/2 connector on the back of a computer looks the same as the Keyboard's PS/2 connector but is coloured green. A USB connector is probably more common today.

A wireless Mouse can be bought which has no cable and looks neater on a computer desk but it will need to contain batteries and a wireless dongle in the USB port of your computer.

You can buy a gaming Mouse which have plenty of buttons, and are highly sensitive with a high DPI (Dots Per Inch). They also come in various shapes and are designed to be comfortable to use. A laser Mouse is usually more accurate and precise than an optical Mouse for gaming and both are superior to a mechanical Mouse which tends to pick up a lot of dust and debris depositing it on the rollers and degrading the performance of the Mouse.

You can configure Mouse settings in Microsoft Windows by going to the Control Panel and selecting 'Mouse'. There are various settings to configure the 'Buttons', 'Pointers', 'Pointer Options', and 'Wheel'. There is also a Hardware tab for checking driver settings and if your Mouse is working okay. Your new Mouse may also have some software included to fine-tune your Mouse.



MENU (Keyboard and Mouse):
1. Keyboard and Mouse